Writing and reading the results: the reporting of rigour strategies in information behaviour research as evident in the published proceedings of the biennial ISIC conferences, 1996 – 2014

Abstract

Introduction. This study examined if and how information behaviour researchers include research rigour tactics in reports of their research projects.

Method. A content analysis was conducted of the 193 research reports published in the 1996 – 2014 ISIC proceedings.

Analysis. Articles were coded for author affiliation, rigour tactics reported, and whether or not enough information was presented to allow readers to assess the quality of the research and replicate the study. Both quantitative (frequencies) and qualitative (excerpts from the articles) data are reported.

Results. In total 698 research rigour tactics were reported for an average of 3.6 per paper, a median of 3 per paper and a range of 0 – 20 tactics across all papers. Twenty-six papers (13.5%) included no rigour tactics at all while 8 (4.1%) included ten or more. Only 76 (39.4%) provided enough information for readers to assess the quality of the study, with fewer (n=44; 22.8%) providing enough information to allow for replication of the study.

Conclusions. Both quantitative and qualitative empirical work is not being reported in ISIC papers in ways that clearly demonstrate research rigour, nor assure replicability.

Keywords: information behaviour

Paper is published in Information Research 21(4): Writing and reading the results: the reporting of research rigour tactics in information behaviour research as evident in the published proceedings of the biennial ISIC conferences, 1996 – 2014

Methodological issues of information behaviour research
Location: Aula Magna Date: September 21, 2016 Time: 12:16 pm - 12:45 pm Lynne Mckechnie Lynne McKechnie Nicole Dalmer Nicole Dalmer Heidi Julien Heidi Julien Cass Mabbott Cass Mabbott Roger Chabot Roger Chabot